100s of titles, one news app for just $10 a month.
Latest National news:
Teal independents punish Liberal moderates for inaction on climate crisis and integrity commission
Climate 200 convenor says ‘people who called themselves moderates didn’t deliver’ while Labor argues election shows ‘teals are eating the…
Read news from The Economist, FT, Bloomberg and more, with one subscription
Learn More
Australian Greens hail ‘best result ever’ with dramatic gains in lower house and Senate
Leader Adam Bandt celebrates ‘massive mandate’ and says Greens are willing to talk to Anthony Albanese if Labor fails to…
Scott Morrison’s faithful downcast as second election miracle falls short
Soft aimless jazz replaces news coverage at the Liberal reception in Sydney with bewildered supporters trying to piece together what…
Australian election 2022: Anthony Albanese claims victory for Labor as Scott Morrison stands down as Liberal leader – live updates
Follow live updates from tonight’s election
Clive Palmer’s massive advertising spend fails to translate into election success for United Australia party
United Australia party vote increases slightly to around 4.7% but was exceeded by the One Nation vote
From analysis to good news, read the world’s best news in one place
Magistrate cautions alleged offender after court temper tantrum
Man swears and loses his temper in court.
Federal election night: what we know so far
The Coalition loses government but it is not clear whether Labor has achieved a big enough swing to form majority…

Scientists find way to make better wheat

By Liv Casben

An Australian led team of international researchers has discovered a gene in wheat that helps produce higher quality crops.

The scientists say the discovery could lead to increasing protein in wheat by up to 25 per cent with the potential to help improve its nutritional and economic value.

The researchers from the University of Adelaide and the UK’s John Innes Centre have identified the genetic driver that improves the yield traits of wheat.

Lead researcher Scott Boden from the University of Adelaide said the significant discovery follows revolutionary progress in wheat science over the past decade.

The scientists say it is the first known example where a forward-genetics screen of a mutant population has been used to identify a gene that controls reproductive development in wheat.

“If you identify genes that control flower development and you modify them so that more flowers are produced, then you can increase the productivity or yield of the plant,” he told AAP.

He said the research was partly driven by the need to increase food security for the increasing human population.

“Probably the most significant discovery is the effect on grain protein content, because if it does translate into modern varieties then it far exceeds anything we can do currently.” 

The discovery was made after the plants were grown in the field, with the mutation helping to increase the crop’s protein content.

“The increase in protein content occurs without the trade-off of a reduced yield so this discovery has even better potential to provide economic benefit to breeders and growers than just the increased nutritional value by itself.”

Dr Boden said the crops are not genetically modified as there is no foreign DNA being introduced into the plant. 

The team expects the new wheat varieties to be available to breeders within three years, with farmers to potentially see the benefits within the decade. 

The research has been published in the journal Science Advances.

What is inkl?
The world’s most important news, from 100+ trusted global sources, in one place.
Morning Edition
Your daily
news overview

Morning Edition ensures you start your day well informed.

No paywalls, no clickbait, no ads
Enjoy beautiful reading

Content is only half the story. The world's best news experience is free from distraction: ad-free, clickbait-free, and beautifully designed.

Expert Curation
The news you need to know

Stories are ranked by proprietary algorithms based on importance and curated by real news journalists to ensure that you receive the most important stories as they break.