Professor Luke O'Neill shares more positive Covid-19 news as hope rises for end of pandemic

By Cormac O'Shea & Larissa Nolan

Professor Luke O'Neill has shared more good news that the Omicron wave may not be as bad as previous Covid bouts.

The optimistic expert has had a look at data in London which suggests that not as many people are getting critically ill from the virus.

Professor O'Neill said: "Promising data from London: the occupation level of ventilation beds hasn’t increased and its been more than two weeks since London cases peaked."

Speaking to the Irish Mirror, O'Neill told how he believes 2022 will be the year we get back to normal.

He said: “By the time we get to March and April, it will be a different story entirely – watch.”

He said widespread antigen testing, vaccine boosters and the arrival of new, effective medications for the virus means: “We will be able to live with it, because of all these various strategies.”

That means no more masks, scrapping of social distancing and an end to the Covid pass system for hospitality. Annual jabs for the elderly and vulnerable will ensure protection.

He said: “Because this is a seasonal virus, once we come into the spring, the counts will start to fall and the boosters will have worked, for definite.

“New anti-viral treatments will be approved in February and that will be a huge weapon.

“We know a lot about this virus now – for heaven’s sake, it’s been almost two years. We have a heavily vaccinated population, which is brilliant, with a strong booster to sustain protection.

“When you put it all together, by the time we get to St Patrick’s Day, the virus will have gone away almost from Ireland, it will seem to be in the background.”

Get the latest breaking news to your inbox by signing up to our free newsletter


What is inkl?

Important stories

See news based on value, not advertising potential. Get the latest news from around the world.

Trusted newsrooms

We bring you reliable news from the world’s most experienced journalists in the most trusted newsrooms.

Ad-free reading

Read without interruptions, distractions or intrusions of privacy.