100s of titles, one news app for just $10 a month.
Dive Deeper:
Peru sues Spain's Repsol for $4.5 bn over oil spill
Lima (AFP) - Peru has filed suit against Spanish energy company Repsol over the massive January oil spill that ravaged…
Morning Brief: Top Financial Stories Dominating on Monday, May 16
CNBC Volkswagen CEO Shares Ambitious EV Ambitions For US Market
First Thing: first war crimes trial in Ukraine begins
Vadim Shysimarin, a 21-year-old Russian commander of the Kantemirovskaya tank division, is charged with murdering a 62-year-old Ukrainian civilian
‘We can’t eat a new road’: Guyanese voice fears over true cost of Exxon’s oil bonanza
Multibillion-dollar deal promising to lift country out of poverty may be false dawn with dire impact on climate, warn campaigners
One subscription that gives you access to news from hundreds of sites
Checks and Balances: Tennessee lawmakers end judicial deference
The Checks and Balances Letter delivers news and information from Ballotpedia’s Administrative State Project, including pivotal actions at the federal…
Surfside commission votes to approve $2 million settlement in Champlain Towers collapse
MIAMI — Surfside commissioners voted Monday to approve a $2 million insurance settlement in the class-action lawsuit related to the…
Get all your news in one place
Latest National news:
Labor increasingly likely to form majority government as Liberals descend into turmoil
Anthony Albanese and his senior leadership and economics team will be sworn in on Monday as PM-elect declares he wants…
Read news from The Economist, FT, Bloomberg and more, with one subscription
Learn More
Informer: Morrison bulldozed in the wrong direction, happy news for Biloela family
Confessing to a bad habit of "bulldozing" at the eleventh hour, and promising to change his ways, was not enough…
Kurt Mann's rolled ankle became a 'ticking time-bomb'
The 156-game utility has missed the Knights past four games.
Peter Dutton firms as next Liberal leader amid fight over future of the party
Dan Tehan and Karen Andrews both touted as potential challengers, but conservatives confident Dutton has the numbers to succeed Scott…
Sharpe double helps Cessnock to 28-4 win over The Entrance
The Goannas jumped the Tigers on the ladder following the victory.
From analysis to good news, read the world’s best news in one place
Police appeal for help locating 13-year-old boy
Jameel was last seen wearing his school uniform on May 13.
From Jenny Morrison’s intriguing fashion choice to Toto the first dog: 10 lighter election moments
The outgoing PM’s wife chose a surprising designer, the French got sassy and Sky News struggled through election night

$230M settlement reached over 2015 California oil spill

By Via AP news wire
Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

The owner of an oil pipeline that spewed thousands of barrels of crude oil onto Southern California beaches in 2015 has agreed to pay $230 million to settle a class-action lawsuit brought by fishermen and property owners, court documents show.

Houston-based Plains All American Pipeline agreed to pay $184 million to fishermen and fish processors and $46 million to coastal property owners in the settlement reached Friday, according to court documents.

The company didn’t admit liability in the agreement, which follows seven years of legal wrangling. The agreement still must undergo a public comment period and needs federal court approval. A hearing on the matter is scheduled for June 10.

“This settlement should serve as a reminder that pollution just can’t be a cost of doing business, and that corporations will be held accountable for environmental damage they cause,” said Matthew Preusch, one of the attorneys who represented the plaintiffs.

Plains All American Pipeline officials didn’t immediately return a message Saturday from The Associated Press seeking comment.

On May 19, 2015, oil gushed from a corroded pipeline north of Refugio State Beach in Santa Barbara County, northwest of Los Angeles, spreading along the coasts of Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

It was the worst California coastal oil spill since 1969 and it blackened popular beaches for miles, killing or fouling hundred of seabirds, seals and other wildlife and hurting tourism and fishing.

A federal investigation said 123,000 gallons spilled, but other estimates by experts in liquids mechanics were as high as 630,000 gallons.

Federal inspectors found that Plains had made several preventable errors, failed to quickly detect the pipeline rupture and responded too slowly as oil flowed toward the ocean.

Plains operators working from a Texas control room more than 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) away had turned off an alarm that would have signaled a leak and, unaware a spill had occurred, restarted the hemorrhaging line after it had shut down, which only made matters worse, inspectors found.

Plains apologized for the spill and paid for the cleanup. The company’s 2017 annual report estimated costs from the spill at $335 million, not including lost revenue. The company also revised its plans for dealing with onshore pipeline spills.

In 2020, Plains agreed to pay $60 million to the federal government to settle allegations that it violated safety laws. It also agreed to bring its nationwide pipeline system into compliance with federal safety laws.

The spill crippled the local oil business because the pipeline was used to transport crude to refineries from seven offshore rigs, including three owned by Exxon Mobil, that have been idle since the spill.

Plains has applied for permission to build a new pipeline but it is facing an uphill battle.

The emerging debate is playing out amid the global climate crisis and as California moves toward banning gas-powered vehicles and oil drilling, while record gas prices have left consumers with sticker shock at the pumps.

A complex environmental review of the pipeline plan is not expected until October.

What is inkl?
The world’s most important news, from 100+ trusted global sources, in one place.
Morning Edition
Your daily
news overview

Morning Edition ensures you start your day well informed.

No paywalls, no clickbait, no ads
Enjoy beautiful reading

Content is only half the story. The world's best news experience is free from distraction: ad-free, clickbait-free, and beautifully designed.

Expert Curation
The news you need to know

Stories are ranked by proprietary algorithms based on importance and curated by real news journalists to ensure that you receive the most important stories as they break.

Dive Deeper:
Peru sues Spain's Repsol for $4.5 bn over oil spill
Lima (AFP) - Peru has filed suit against Spanish energy company Repsol over the massive January oil spill that ravaged…
Morning Brief: Top Financial Stories Dominating on Monday, May 16
CNBC Volkswagen CEO Shares Ambitious EV Ambitions For US Market
First Thing: first war crimes trial in Ukraine begins
Vadim Shysimarin, a 21-year-old Russian commander of the Kantemirovskaya tank division, is charged with murdering a 62-year-old Ukrainian civilian
‘We can’t eat a new road’: Guyanese voice fears over true cost of Exxon’s oil bonanza
Multibillion-dollar deal promising to lift country out of poverty may be false dawn with dire impact on climate, warn campaigners
One subscription that gives you access to news from hundreds of sites
Checks and Balances: Tennessee lawmakers end judicial deference
The Checks and Balances Letter delivers news and information from Ballotpedia’s Administrative State Project, including pivotal actions at the federal…
Surfside commission votes to approve $2 million settlement in Champlain Towers collapse
MIAMI — Surfside commissioners voted Monday to approve a $2 million insurance settlement in the class-action lawsuit related to the…
Get all your news in one place