Queen’s hope for a ‘world where diabetes can do no harm’

By Laura Elston
PA Archive

The Queen has sent her “warmest good wishes” to all those living with diabetes to mark the 100th anniversary of the first successful insulin treatment.

The monarch, who is patron of Diabetes UK said in a message to the charity that she hopes scientific discoveries yet to come will bring the organisation “ever closer to achieving your vision of a world where diabetes can do no harm”.

Leonard Thompson, a 14-year-old who was dying from type 1 diabetes, became the first person to receive a life-saving insulin injection on January 11 1922.

The Queen said: “On the 100th anniversary of the first successful treatment with insulin, I send my warmest good wishes to all those living with and affected by diabetes.

“This milestone provides an opportunity to celebrate this breakthrough that continues to improve the lives of people living with diabetes around the world.

“I extend my thanks for the ongoing hard work and dedication of the scientific, medical and research communities, who work tirelessly to further advance their understanding of the condition.

“As patron of Diabetes UK, I send my greetings to all staff and volunteers, and hope that the discoveries yet to come bring you ever closer to achieving your vision of a world where diabetes can do no harm.”

The Queen has been patron of Diabetes UK since 1952 – the year she acceded to the throne.

The 95-year-old head of state, who is less than a month away from reaching her Platinum Jubilee milestone, has been on doctors’ orders to rest after undergoing preliminary investigations in hospital in October.


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