People are using the red flag emoji to share their biggest warning signs in friendships and relationships

By Lauren Milici

Twitter users are sharing red flags to signify warning signs in friendships and relationships.

(Picture: AFP via Getty Images)

A new trend has emerged in which Twitter users use the red flag emoji to signify what they believe are “red flags” in regards to a new partner, friend, or person in general.

A hypothetical statement is made, followed by multiple red flag emoji. The emoji’s proper name is “triangular flag on post,” as per the Unicode Consortium (a non-profit that maintains the computing-industry standard of text and emoji), but is commonly seen as a literal red flag.

Some of the tweets are humorous and lighthearted, while others point out serious warning signs in relationships and the opposite sex.

Celebrities have even joined in on the trend, with Wonder Woman herself, Lynda Carter, and Motown legend Smokey Robinson sharing tweets of their own.

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Several big-name companies have also tweeted red flags that cleverly echo their brand.

The most popular tweets appear to comment on men’s etiquette when it comes to flirting and dating in the digital age.

Not everyone on the platform is enjoying the trend, with some users adding the red flag emoji to their Muted Words lists, and others tweeting that a red flag tweet is a red flag in and of itself. Some have commented that some of the tweets are a little too personal and specific. The trend has become a nuisance for those who use screen readers, as the tweets read “triangular post on flag” and repeat the phrase as many times as the emoji has been tweeted, thus rendering the trend inaccessible.

Despite the growing annoyance with the trend, new red flag tweets continue to pop up hourly.


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