Meghan Markle and Harry to christen Lilibet in US instead of UK, source claims

By Leonie Chao-Fong

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will not have their daughter Lilibet christened in the UK, according to royal sources.

There had been suggestions the couple would return to Britain to have their four-month-old baptised at Windsor Castle like their son Archie, two.

Lilibet Diana, affectionately known as Lili and who is named after the Queen and after Harry's mum Diana, was born in a hospital in Santa Barbara, California in June.

But a palace insider told the Telegraph : “There will not be a christening in the UK. It is not happening."

Another source said it would be “highly unlikely”.

Prince Harry and Meghan joined by her mother, Doria Ragland, their son, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, and the Queen and Prince Philip in 2019 ((Credit too long, see caption))

Instead, Lilibet is likely to be christened into the Episcopal Church of the US, a member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

If baptised in California, she would not automatically be considered a member of the Church of England, unless she came to Britain and joined a CofE congregation.

Anyone can say they are a member of the Church of England if they worship in a CofE church and are not a member of an incompatible religion.

A member of the Royal Family does not need to be baptised to remain in the line of succession.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry with baby Archie, who was christened in the UK, in 2019 (Getty Images)

In 2018, Meghan Markle was baptised and confirmed by the Archbishop of Canterbury in a secret service at the Chapel Royal in St James’s Palace.

Holy water from the River Jordan from the private Royal Family font was poured on Meghan's head in the ceremony and The Chapel Royal choir of six Gentlemen-in-Ordinary and ten Children of the Chapel performed throughout the service, it was claimed.

A member of the Royal family does not need to be baptised to remain in the line of succession (The Duke and Duchess of Sussex ©)

The Sussexes stirred controversy with their first child Archie's christening as they kept the ceremony private.

In August, royal commentator Richard Fitzwilliams told Express.co.uk: "Harry and Meghan’s relations with the British press went badly downhill when Archie was christened in private and the names of the godparents were not released.”

He continued: "It must be likely that she will be christened in California though there were rumours of a possible christening at Windsor.”

Mr Fitzwilliams said: "It seems certain that her christening will be in Meghan’s home state and with the secrecy but without the controversy that surrounded Archie’s christening."

It comes after a spokesperson for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex confirmed the couple will not be flying back to the UK for a party in honour of Princess Diana.

There had been suggestions the couple would return to Britain to have their four-month-old baptised at Windsor Castle (AFP via Getty Images)

Around 100 people are expected to attend the bash at Kensington Palace on October 19, with Diana’s old friend Sir Elton John said to be on the guest list.

The celebration has been organised to thank donors for funding a commemorative statue of Diana which now sits in Kensington Palace’s Sunken Garden.

It was previously reported that royal aides were preparing for Meghan and Harry to make a surprise return for the bash.

Harry has returned to the UK on only two occasions since moving to the US, namely for his granddad's Philip's funeral and for the unveiling of Diana's statue on what would've been her 60th birthday.

Meghan stayed at home on both occasions, mainly on medical grounds as she was heavily pregnant when the funeral took place in April.


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