Liverpool at risk of further FIFA bans while Reds might face new financial reality after £120m deal

By Elliott Bretland

Your morning digest for Friday, September 10

Liverpool at risk of further FIFA bans after Alisson, Fabinho and Roberto Firmino problem

Liverpool could be without a number of senior players for future fixtures if a resolution is not found in the Premier League’s ongoing clash with the Brazilian FA.

Jurgen may potentially be unable to call on Alisson , Fabinho and Roberto Firmino for the Reds trips to Watford on October 16 and Atletico Madrid in the Champions League on October 19.

The Reds, who travel to Leeds this weekend, are currently one of a number of English top-flight sides set to be without their Brazilian internationals after the Selecao invoked FIFA’s ‘five-day rule’ following Premier League sides’ refusal to release their players due to Brazil’s current red list country status and subsequent coronavirus quarantine rules imposed by the UK government.

FIFA have reluctantly opted into this action at the Brazilian FA’s insistence that it be invoked, though the Premier League remain in discussions and are currently looking to find a resolution.

Affected clubs, including Liverpool , are contesting such a ruling given the unprecedented circumstances which prevented players from being able to travel and report for national team duty without needing to quarantine in a hotel for 10 days upon their return to English soil.

Brazil currently have three matches scheduled for the October international break, before double-headers in November and January/February with all seven fixtures scheduled to take place in current red-listed countries.

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The Selecao are currently due to travel to Venezuela on October 7 before a trip to Colombia on October 10, while they will then host Uruguay on October 14.

If a resolution cannot be reached and all current UK travel rules and restrictions remain the same, Premier League clubs would again have to block their players from being called up if they didn’t want them to undergo a 10-day quarantine in a hotel upon their return.

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Liverpool might face new financial reality after £120m deal

For Liverpool and their rivals, their financial growth has been predicated on a buoyant broadcasting market.

TV rights for both the Premier League's domestic and international markets are worth in the region of £75m per year , with Sky, BT Sport and Amazon giving the League's clubs some financial security in these pandemic affected times by rolling over their existing deal through the 2022-2025 cycle for the same price as before.

Over the past 20 years in the Premier League the overall deal for combined rights has risen from just over £1bn to around £9bn, with international rights now worth nearly as much as domestic rights, delivering £1.3bn for the League each season. It is numbers like this that have underpinned the enormous growth of the competition and the inflated transfer fees and salaries.

Earlier this year the Premier League put a number of markets out to tender for the next cycle, with the potential for broadcasters to lock in six-year deals for the first time in a bid to maintain interest and value in the market.

The Premier League invited over 40 European and Central Asian countries to tender for the rights from 2022-2023 onwards, with both three-year and six-year cycles available. They sold up to 233 live matches available in European markets in the 2019-22 cycle and sold 380 live matches outside of Europe.

And while prices have held up well in some markets and increased in others, one of the Premier League's key markets, China, has seen the value of their deal reduced.

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