Katie Piper and Aviva help people make difficult decisions with free online academy

By Ria Tesia

A free online teaching academy has been launched to help people defeat indecision. The triumvirate partnership will see insurer Aviva, writer and activist Katie Piper, and behavioural psychologist Jo Hemmings provide training for people who need a hand with moving forward in their lives.

The academy was formed on the back of new research from insurer Aviva, that revealed Brits lose almost 43 nights’ sleep a year worrying about making the right decision. This is the equivalent of an astounding 17 billion hours of lost sleep amongst UK adults.

When it comes to life’s most difficult choices, getting divorced or ending a long-term relationship tops the list (31%); followed by buying a new home (29%) and relocating to a new country (27%). Other sleep-losing, difficult choices include changing jobs or career paths (27%), getting married (25%) and having or adopting a child (21%).

The Aviva Decision School is a free course available to the public. It is designed to help people learn the art of confident decision-making and break free from the shackles of procrastination as they grapple with the everyday and life-changing choices they have to make in their lives.

Lessons will cover a range of different areas specially targeted at how to make life choices with ease, including overcoming any related anxiety, making decisions under pressure, and trusting one’s instincts.

The Aviva Decision School includes inspiring and practical advice and insights from a range of expert decision-makers including former superintendent in the Metropolitan Police Leroy Logan MBE and Guinness World Record breaker Vanessa O’Brien.

Raj Kumar, Corporate Reputation Director at Aviva, said: “Our research shows that the majority of us struggle with decision-making at various stages of our lives and, as a result, we Brits are no strangers to procrastination. We know the last 18 months have really made a lot of people rethink their priorities, which has led to some challenging decision-making.

“That’s why it felt like just the right time for us to launch the Aviva Decision School with Katie and Jo - to help the nation tackle its issues with indecision and provide people with the practical tools they need to make decisions with ease.”

Behavioural Psychologist, Jo Hemmings, said: “Making decisions – and avoiding them – can have a huge impact on our emotional and physical wellbeing, as well as our relationships, finances and a host of other factors. It’s natural for many of us to feel overwhelmed when it comes to life’s more difficult decisions.”

Author, philanthropist and presenter, Katie Piper, said: “Life can bring many opportunities and challenges, which are sometimes difficult to navigate. Being part of the Aviva Decision School has been a wonderful opportunity and has allowed me to reflect on decisions I’ve made throughout my life and professional career.”

The top 15 most difficult decisions to make:

  1. Getting divorced or ending a long-term relationship - 31%
  2. Buying a new home - 29%
  3. Relocating to a new country - 27%
  4. Changing job or career – 27%
  5. Getting married – 25%
  6. Having or adopting a child – 21%
  7. Moving in with a partner – 20%
  8. Relocating to new city – 20%
  9. Caring for a family member – 19%
  10. Where to invest money – 15%
  11. Deciding when to retire – 13%
  12. Choosing a pension – 10%
  13. School choices – 8%
  14. Pursuing further education and choosing a degree (or deciding not to do so) – 8%
  15. Getting a pet – 7%

Visit the Aviva Decision School and view the first suite of tools – Lesson one: Making decisions under pressure.

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