Dublin Airport flights and holiday hotel prices set to skyrocket, says Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary

By Alex Dunne

Short-haul flights and hotels are set to skyrocket in price next summer as Irish people rush to get abroad again.

That's according to Ryanair chief Michael O'Leary, who has warned customers to expect price hikes across the board when making their plans for their 2022 holidays.

He believes that the surging demand for seats will not meet the amount of flights available, leading to airlines bumping up ticket prices for all destinations.

The demand would then have a knock-on effect across the top holiday destinations, which would then raise their hotel prices.

He also believes that the closures of companies like Thomas Cook, Flybe, and Norwegian Air - which will remove 30 million potential seats across Europe - and capacity reductions at the likes of Alitalia, will only further exacerbate the problem.

Michael O'Leary (Gareth Chaney/Collins)

"I think there will be a dramatic recovery in holiday tourism within Europe next year," he told the Sunday Times.

"And the reason why I think prices will be dramatically higher is that there's less capacity.

"Take out Thomas Cook, Flybe, Norwegian,Alitalia's reducing its fleet by 40%. There is going to be about 20% less short-haul capacity in Europe in 2022 with a dramatic recovery in demand."

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