Delivery driver floors customer with 'cheeky' drop off behaviour

By Benjamin Roberts-haslam

A woman was fuming after a "cheeky" delivery driver left her parcel inside her house.

The woman, who lives in Southport, was shocked when she saw the delivery driver open her front door and let himself in.

Posting on a neighbourhood app, she wrote: "What gives a delivery driver the right to ring the doorbell, open your front door and shout hello and walk into your home and put a parcel on your sideboard.

READ MORE: Deliveroo driver kept disabled customer's Aldi food shop then swore at him

"[It's] cheeky if you ask me but that’s what happened yesterday. I wouldn’t even dream of trying somebody’s front door let alone walk in if I wasn’t invited."

The post prompted different responses, with one woman remembering the days when delivery drivers would often let themselves in.

She commented: "I can remember a time when back doors were usually unlocked, or the key was under the mat, and those delivering the meat and the (separate ones) delivering the fish, would come in, put them in the fridge (if there was one) and take the correct money out of the purse on the kitchen table, left there deliberately, and go!

"That was not called 'cheeky' but 'trust'."

One man saw it as a positive. He wrote: "A lot do try the doors but on the positive side they want to leave it somewhere safe.

"A bit cheeky but better than having it nicked I suppose."

Others also agreed that it was a positive thing to do, although one woman shared the customer's outrage.

She commented: "Absolutely not. That’s trespass."

Do you think the delivery driver was in the right or the wrong? Leave a comment below.

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