Apple iPhone 14 Pro may finally get rid of the notch. Here's what might change

By Danny Cyril D Cruze
Apple iPhone 13 series comes with a nearly 20% smaller notch (Bloomberg)

Apple recently launched the new iPhone 13 series smartphones. While Apple did reduce the size of the notch, the over all screen usability didn't change much. Apple has been sticking to the notch design since iPhone X series which was introduced in 2017. Since four years, the company has maintained its design language due to the FaceID sensors. A new report suggests that the notch's reign might finally come to an end with the iPhone 14 Pro models that will be launched next year. 

According to a research note attributed to popular Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, the next iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max will offer a big redesign that replaces the notch with a punch-hole cutout. The analyst also claimed that Apple might use a 48MP wide-angle sensor next year. 

It is still not clear if Apple will be carrying the FaceID technology ahead or replace it with a fingerprint sensor or some other biometric security option. The analyst Kuo claims that Apple might only launch the in-screen fingerprint sensor by the year 2023. If that's turns out to be true, it will be interesting to see what Apple has planned for the iPhone 14 series. 

Similar to every year, Apple will be launching the iPhone 14 flagships in the second half of 2022. Additionally, the 2022 iPhone lineup is expected to include a new 6.7-inch non-Pro iPhone to complement the standard vanilla model. 

On the other hand, Apple might stop the production of ‘mini’ models in favour of the bigger device. In order to fill the void of a small form factor, Apple will be launching the next gen iPhone SE. However, it is reported to feature the same dated design with a home button. 


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