Anthony Joshua "boxed Tyson Fury's head off" in secret sparring session

By Donagh Corby

Anthony Joshua's legendary gym spar with Tyson Fury reportedly saw the younger Joshua get the better of the 'Gypsy King'.

Despite the pair having an ongoing war of words over the last few years, Fury and Joshua have never managed to step into the ring together to unify the heavyweight division.

But what very few fans know is that Fury and Joshua have, in fact, fought before, with just a few officials and gym members in attendance at a London amateur boxing club.

READ MORE: AJ responds to Fury's offer of TWO huge fights in 2022

The ABC gym in Finchley was the host venue in 2010, with Fury arriving looking for a few light rounds and a Rolex on the line if someone could drop him.

Up stepped the relative unknown Anthony Joshua; fresh off a win at the ABA championships and two years out from making his name at the London Olympics.

"A friend of mine George Carman, a boxing man, rang me up and said Tyson is coming down to London to do Steve Bunce's hour," coach Sean Murphy explained on BBC 5 Live.

"I've got committee members all standing at the back, people have got wind he's going to be here.

"And then Tyson puts his hands together and he goes 'bring it on'."

The pair headed into the gym, and Brady asked if Fury's team would be paying Joshua, at the time an amateur from a council estate, for his sparring.

This idea did not go down well with Fury's team, who weren't interested in 'weighing in' the young fighter.

"I've asked will he weigh us in and Hughie's gone 'no no, we don't do that'," he explained.

And the legendary session was almost stopped when Fury emerged without a shirt on, which isn't permitted at amateur gyms.

"He's come to the ring in an old scruffy pair of shorts and I had to tell him to put a top on.

"He's looked at me and gone 'oh I only have my jumper', and I said if he ever comes back he has to have a top but we'll allow it this time."

Fury has admitted in the past that he was planning to go easy on Joshua in the first round, but was quickly hurt by the youngster.

And Brady corroborates that story, saying that Joshua hurt him.

"I think he was expecting, because he knew Josh was 18 and hadn't been boxing, an easy few rounds," he continued.

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"They've come out and Josh has thrown an uppercut, left hook and he's on wobbly legs!

"He's holding the ropes and I'm telling him 'no you can't do that you can't hold the ropes' and he gets off, but Josh got the better of him in the third round.

"I've said to him for the second to just go and do what he's done, but Tyson starts mouthing off to Josh, getting in his ear talking to him.

"So Josh is getting a bit wild, trying to knock him out, and I had to tell him to stick to his boxing and do what I told him and ignore the talking.

"So he's gone out the next round, ignored it and boxed his head off and I've said 'come on jump out'."

But Fury was having none of it, and demanded another round.

However, after refusing to pay for the spar with Joshua, and likely about to ramp up and try to finish the youngster, Brady said no more and sent in another fighter.

"Tyson Fury's gone 'no, no, no,' and he's begging for one more round," he continued.

"I went 'no, get out Josh, you've done three rounds', because I knew what the craic was, he was going to try and put it on him.

"Josh probably could have dealt with it, but I wasn't going to have it because I'm not sending an amateur in with a professional and not let him get something out of it."

Fury ultimately didn't end up giving Joshua his Rolex, but admitted that it was close to happening.

And the pair will be able to buy much more than a Rolex with their multi-million pound paycheques from the rematch, whenever it ends up happening.


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